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Minnesota Roofing Contractor | Residential Roofing MN

Underlayment Requirements For Minneapolis Minnesota Underlayment is a material placed on the roof sheathing before installing shingles. It is usually a thin, black, paper-like material, often referred to as roofing felt. It comes in a roll and is usually 36” wide. It also comes in different thicknesses or weights. The minimum acceptable underlayment is 15# roofing felt. Underlayment may also be a self-adhering, rubber-like material. This type of underlayment is most often used at the roof edge and in valleys to help minimize damage from ice-dams. Many shingle manufacturers recommend their own type of self-adhering underlayment and where it should be used. Some local building codes and UL standards require that a shingle underlayment be installed. Underlayment shall comply with IRC Section 905.2.3 and its application shall be according to IRC Sections R905.2.7 and R905.2.7.1. Minnesota’s climate is considered severe with respect to underlayment requirements. An ice barrier is required and shall be installed as follows: • The ice barrier shall consist of two layers of underlayment (15# roofing felt) cemented together or a single layer of a self-adhering sheet. Whichever product is used, it must be installed parallel to and extend from the eave edge to a point at least 24 inches inside the exterior wall line. • After installation of the ice barrier, install remaining underlayment as follows: For roof slopes of 2 units vertical in 12 units horizontal (2:12) up to 4 units vertical in 12 units horizontal (4:12), underlayment shall be two layers of 15# felt. Starting at the ice barrier, install the first course of 36 inch wide underlayment lapping the ice barrier a...

Roofing Contractor MN | Minneapolis Roofing Company

Roofing Contractors Minneapolis & St Paul MN All roofing systems are made of a number of different components: roof sheathing, underlayment, roofing material, roof intersections, flashing details and ventilation. Each of these systems must be installed correctly for the system to work as designed. Roof underlayment acts as water barrier installed underneath the roofing system. Essentially, it is a roof underneath the roof. It protects your roof from condensation that may form underneath the metal due to the differences in temperatures in the attic and outside. More Information On Felt Roofing Underlayment One of the most common mistakes being made today in the installation of asphalt shingles on new or re-roofing work is the practice of not using felt underlayment.  Many thousands of new homes do not have felt beneath the shingles.  This is a HUGE mistake! Remember, shingles rely on gravity to keep water from entering your house.  It is very possible for wind driven rain to get underneath your shingles or to enter along valleys (especially when the valley shingles have been improperly trimmed!)  Without felt Underlayment, you have no hope of stopping a leak.  With felt, there is a possibility that the water will travel down the felt and not enter your house. Many asphalt shingles that are installed on residential roofs carry a Class A fire rating.  This rating is given to the shingles by independent laboratories.  The ratings are granted only when the shingles are installed as they were tested in laboratory conditions.  The shingles are tested with felt in place under the shingles.  As such, if felt is deleted on your job, the shingles...

Roof Repair MN | Minnesota Roof Leak Repair

MN Roof Leak | Roof Leak Repair MN A roof leak can result in significant damage to insulation, walls, ceilings, flooring and personal property. If undetected, a roof leak can cause rot that will endanger the structural integrity of the roof framing system and cause costly repairs.
 The larger the leak, the greater the damage; however, even a pinhole leak can ruin an entire room during a single storm. According to the National Roofing Contractors Association, a roof should be inspected at least twice annually — once in the fall before the rains and again in the late spring to determine how it fared during the winter. Look for loose shingles or shakes, or, if you have a tile or slate roof, check for missing or cracked pieces. On shingle roofs, look for curling, fraying and tears at the edges. Check the flashings around chimneys, vents, skylights and other roof penetrations. They should be tight and in good condition. Maintaining good roof flashings, especially those at roof edges and penetrations, is crucial. Many roof leaks are actually flashing leaks. Sometimes a visual inspection of the roof isn’t enough. A water test may be in order. You’ll need to venture atop the roof to do this effectively. Use a firmly braced or tied-off ladder equipped with rubber safety feet and wear rubber-soled shoes to avoid slipping. Using a garden hose, run water onto the areas where a leak is most likely. For example, if there is a water stain on the ceiling just in front of the fireplace in the living room you’ll want to concentrate on that general area....

Roofing MN | Roof Flashing

Roof Flashing Most leaks take place around roof penetrations. They need to be installed correctly and checked periodically. Did you know that 90% of roof leaks are caused by improperly installed or deteriorated roof flashings? The other 10% of roof leaks are usually the result of improperly installed windows or gutters which can cause water to leak along and inside walls of your home. Roof Flashing Done Right If you’re collecting dripping water in a pot beneath your roof, you may want to inspect the roof flashing. Anywhere surfaces intersect on a roof is a prime spot for water seepage. Flashing provides the extra protection these spots need. These problem areas include the edges of skylights and chimneys, soil stacks, vent fans and roof valleys, as well as the intersection of the roof deck and dormer walls. Most flashing is made of galvanized metal, but DIY’ers may prefer aluminum flashing because it’s easier to bend. Most flashing products are designed for easy installation, and if the material is installed correctly, then your roof shouldn’t leak. However, from time to time, the nails that fasten flashing work loose, or the flashing material pulls away from seams and joints and requires maintenance. Here’s a look at some general principles of roof flashing that will help guide you through a proper repair or replacement—or even new construction. Roof Design All roofing systems are made of a number of different components: roof sheathing, underlayment, roofing material, roof intersections, flashing details and ventilation. Each of these systems must be installed correctly for the system to work as designed. Common pitched roof systems rely on...

Roof Requirements For Minneapolis MN

City Of Minneapolis Minnesota Roof Requirements The information here is intended for use as a reference when performing roofing work using asphalt-based organic or fiberglass shingles on one-family and two-family residential structures with sloped roofs. In addition to the information, refer to the shingle manufacturer’s instructions. The code requirements for roofing of one-family and two-family dwellings can be found in the 2006 International Residential Code (IRC) Chapter 9. There are also roofing requirements in the 2006 International Building Code Chapter 15. Both documents are part of the Minnesota Building Code. This article summarizes the requirements of the IRC and is not intended as a complete list of all code requirements. City of Minneapolis Policies Flashing Existing metal flashing may be re-used if it is in good condition. Roof Decking Asphalt-based organic and fiberglass shingle roofing materials must be installed on solid roof decking. When old roofing materials are removed, the original roof boards may have spaces between them. Spaced roof boards can create a fastening problem for asphalt and fiberglass shingles. Any roof boards with spaces greater than ½” must be corrected. The following are approved methods for correcting spacing: • Install strips of at least 1 X 4 nominal boards in the spaces. • Re-deck the roof with a minimum 11/32” thick panel sheathing product. No edge of the sheathing can be left exposed to the weather. Cover edges with metal or wood trim. • Small areas may be corrected by moving boards around to reduce spaces to less than ½” and then add a minimum of 1 X 4 boards to fill the spaces. Note: Shingle manufacturers...
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